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Name Funerary

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Image of 2003.10.2 -

2003.10.2 -

Chavin painted textile section of a tunic, depicts a proto-typical staff bearing figure with fanged mouth and claws visible on the hands and feet, serpents form his staff and hang from his crown, the headband is decorated with a bean motif. A Chavin style fragment with painted images, provides some insight regarding the nature of this cultural exchange. The textile, dating from ca. 400 B.C.E., would likely have been worn by a male of high social standing. The fragment comes from the site of Karwa, located in the south coast of Peru. Some of the earliest remains of cultivated cotton, dating from about 3,500-3,000 B.C.E., were actually discovered in the central coast of Peru and Ecuador, no

Image of 2007.11.2 -

2007.11.2 -

Central coast cultures such as the Chancay are known primarily through burial goods. Vast numbers of textiles have been preserved from the area, though little is known about their specific context because most were recovered by looters, and only a few have been excavated scientifically. Chancay tombs were notable for their textiles and included elaborate gauzes such as the cotton Panel seen here. This type of monochrome openwork with square spaces and embroidery is unique to Chancay and is reminiscent of fishing net. As such, it reflects a textile tradition that developed out of net-making needs, and it signifies the culture's long history fishing the Humboldt Current off the Peruvian coas

Image of 98.4.1 -

98.4.1 -

Woven decorative fringed border with mythological beings. Keeping in mind that some Paracas embroideries measured up to 85 feet long,this piece is a small fragment of the border of a much larger piece. It nevertheless contains a great deal of valuable information for understanding the Paracas textile tradition and the culture as a whole. The border strip shows a row of repeating anthropomorphic figures with outstretched limbs, suggesting that they are in flight. The color scheme is typical of Block Color embroideries (see Notes), with a predominance of rich green, red, yellow, and orange hues. The figures wear stylized masks revealing only a triangular chignon of hair that seems to proje

Image of 57.22 -

57.22 -

This highly detailed funerary pillow dating from the Song dynasty, 960 AD - 1279 AD, was produced during a period when ceramic ware was highly sought after and exported to regions as far as Eastern Europe and Africa. On this funerary pillow, the ceramic form is painted with free-flowing decoration utilizing a floral pattern of scrolling tendrils. Nested within the vine-like spandrels, a protrusion of flowers bloom to decorate the surface with a whimsical, asymmetrical, repeating surface pattern.

Image of 59.19 -

59.19 -

Egyptian mummy case for a falcon, carved wood with traces of paint, back is missing, dated to Third Intermediate-Late Period, 1070-664 BCE, 1085-332 BC, by Dr. R. Bianchi (4/91).

Image of 59.19 -

59.19 -

Egyptian mummy case for a falcon, carved wood with traces of paint, back is missing, dated to Third Intermediate-Late Period, 1070-664 BCE, 1085-332 BC, by Dr. R. Bianchi (4/91).

Image of 61.74 -

61.74 -

This tomb figure, in the form of an imposing creature, is powerful in appearance although small in stature. Full-bodied and winged as an "incorporeal spirit," it is positioned on squat hind legs on a raised double cylindrical platform. The muscular beast turns its head to the left, with a severe grimace and frowning expression indicated by squinting eyes and straining eyebrows. The lively gesture and pose of the beast are necessary for a guardian tomb figure, whose sole purpose is to protect the deceased from trespassers and evil spirits. Other outstanding features that define its mythic, unearthly dimension include fleshy, antenna-like horns, a coiling snake that nestles beneath its chin, an

Image of 92.6.3 - N/A

92.6.3 - N/A

This face is carved from wood and has traces of white, black and orange pigment; a white ground layer; and a brown resin-like substance on its surface. The top of the face ends just above the eyebrows. The back is flat, roughly carved and sawed, unpainted with traces of an adhesive.

Image of 92.9.18 -

92.9.18 -

This terracotta figure of the standing man from Wei dynasty was one of three figures found in the grave of a person of a high stature. Figures such as these are most often found in Confucian burials. It was a common belief that the deceased could take with him family members, servants, personal possessions, animals, and even his house. Thus models were made and placed in tombs, a practice that had begun as early as the Han dynasty (202 BC -AD 220). The standing man represents an official of the deceased. He wears an ankle-length robe with long sleeves, hands clasped together in front of his chest. Traces of black and red pigment, which have faded or chipped, are apparent on the robe of

Image of 92.9.19 -

92.9.19 -

This terracotta figure of the standing woman from Wei dynasty was one of three figures found in the grave of a person of a high stature. Figures such as these are most often found in Confucian burials. It was a common belief that the deceased could take with him family members, servants, personal possessions, animals, and even his house. Thus models were made and placed in tombs, a practice that had begun as early as the Han dynasty (202 BC -AD 220). The standing woman represents a courtier or servant of the deceased. She is slender, with a high-set hairdo or headdress. She wears a long robe, belted at the waist, with a dress garment beneath it. She holds her left hand at her waist and

Image of 92.9.20 -

92.9.20 -

This terracotta figure of the warrior from Wei dynasty was one of three figures found in the grave of a person of a high stature. Figures such as these are most often found in Confucian burials. It was a common belief that the deceased could take with him family members, servants, personal possessions, animals, and even his house. Thus models were made and placed in tombs, a practice that had begun as early as the Han dynasty (202 BC -AD 220). The warrior represents a protector of the deceased. He has an elaborate hairdo or headdress, with a top-knot and bun at the back. He wears a cuirass and a quiver on his back, and armor covers him from shoulders to mid-thigh; two-garmenst show ben

Image of 98.4.22 -

98.4.22 -

Paracas embroidered border decorated with feline "Oculate" being. Unlike the textiles of many other cultures, Paracas textiles are embroidered rather than painted. Embroidery is a superstructural technique, meaning that stitches are made on top of a plain ground cloth to form the textile's principal decoration. Paracas artisans excelled at a number of different embroidery techniques, including the Linear Style and Broad Line Style, whose names reveal their essential characteristics. But perhaps their most virtuoso achievement can be found in the Block Color style of embroidery. Block Color embroidery consists of outlining the central figure or design element and then filling in the inter

Image of 99.2.29 -

99.2.29 -

Feline weaving sample, weaving is attached to two wooden sticks on either end, half is woven and half is unwoven black thread, area around feline's legs and head is slit weaving; remainder is interlocked weaving, gold and black striped pattern below feline's body, feline is composed of grey, white, black, and gold thread, showing teeth, background is red. This textile sampler on a miniature tapestry loom produced between 300 and 600 C.E. by a Chancay weaver, offers opportunities for interpretation and insight into the process of creation. As the textile and loom are in miniature, it is likely that they were included in a burial. Art historians have supposed that such looms and samplers inc