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Name Portrait

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Image of P91 - Rembrandt van Rijn

P91 - Rembrandt van Rijn

Rembrandt's Jews in the Synagogue depicts Jewish life in mid-17th century Amsterdam. It is indicative of the interconnection and mutual respect of different cultures at the beginnings of the pluralistic society pioneered by the Dutch at that time. Much of Holland's development occurred during Rembrandt's life, including the settlement of various Jewish groups attracted to the Netherlands in the early 17th century by the promise of religious tolerance and a thriving economy. The two largest groups were the Ashkenazic and Sephardic Jews, who no longer had to feign the belief in Christianity that had been forced upon them in their adopted homelands. By 1796, Jews were granted full citizen rights

Image of 2014.4.4 - Warhol, Andy

2014.4.4 - Warhol, Andy

"Muhammad Ali," 1978 by Andy Warhol, screenprint on Strathmore paper, 40 x 30 inches. This print is extra, out of the edition and is designated for research and educational purposes only.

Image of 58.23 - Mor, Antonis

58.23 - Mor, Antonis

Though portrait painting can trace its roots back to antiquity, Antonis Mor's (North Netherlandish painter, born 1512-1516, died ca. 1576) portrait of Charles shows the royal patronage to which artists attached themselves, rather than continuing to work in the guild system. Mor's success as an artist was analogous to his rise in society, and being more socially prominent than his Netherlandish contemporaries, he enjoyed patronage that allowed him access to the political world. His master, Jan van Scorel (1495-1562), had nurtured much of Mor's success, including his knowledge of classical antiquity and associations with royalty and high clergy. Rivaled in skill by Titian at the time (ca. 1488-

Image of 58.16 - Bernini, Gian Lorenzo

58.16 - Bernini, Gian Lorenzo

The revival of the classical tradition of the independent portrait bust was one of the more noteworthy accomplishments of Italian Renaissance art. Unlike the typical ancient Roman bust, an idealized, abstract form that is envisioned only from the front and set apart by a supporting base, Renaissance busts are merely a fragment, which can evoke both physical and mental characteristics of a whole person for the viewer. In addition, this bust, with the head turned slightly to the right and tilted to the left, and the left shoulder higher than the right, differs from the stiffer forms seen in classical busts. Renaissance artists allowed for the illusion of mobility and movement in portrait busts.

Image of 59.2 -

59.2 -

This bust-length figure crowned with laurel leaves, wearing a broadly-draped cape fastened over a square-necked tunic, appears to be a 1500-1599 AD man in the guise of a Roman emperor. However, this facial type, with thick eyebrows and brushy moustache, does not resemble any known antique emperor type. It is nevertheless based upon the late Hellenistic and Roman belief in survival after death, and that the face was the vestige of the mortal being who either earned or lost a blissful hereafter. Its visual sources are late Roman: 2nd-century C.E. male busts are shown with hair and beards that cascade with curls, as opposed to a century later, when the long, flowing curls vanish and the close-fi

Image of 60.40 - Poorter, Willem de

60.40 - Poorter, Willem de

Willem de Poorter, a Dutch follower of Rembrandt, depicts Mary Magdalene, 1630-1639 as an image of feminine beauty, with delicate facial features and a sensuous body. She wears a silky red gown as a symbol of passion, sinfulness, and vanity, as well as suffering. In a moment of spiritual struggle and intense devotion, she turns her head toward Heaven showing remorse for her sins with her clasped hands, the redness of her eyes, and the pearl-like tears that roll down her face. She has thrown onto the floor her luxurious accessories, gold coins, and jars of unguent, used both to perfume her flesh for forbidden acts and to cleanse Christ's feet. Without fear, she has rejected the pleasures of ea

Image of 61.19 - Abbott, Berenice

61.19 - Abbott, Berenice

Photographic portrait of James Joyce in Paris by Berenice Abbott (1898 - 1991).

Image of 63.37 - Durer, Albrecht

63.37 - Durer, Albrecht

Desiderius Erasmus, Christian theologian and humanist, witnessed the burgeoning movement that would come to be known as the Protestant Reformation, yet remained committed to reforming the Church from within. Here, he is depicted by printer and fellow theorist Albrecht Durer. Erasmus represented a more moderate position than his contemporary, Martin Luther, a man for whom Durer clearly had sympathy, though unlike Luther the artist never openly broke with the Roman Catholic Church. His religious loyalties notwithstanding, Erasmus gained the respect of both Luther and Durer for his superior learning and commitment to reform. The respect was mutual, for Erasmus was a great admirer of Durer's w

Image of 64.22 -

64.22 -

The object is a wood sculpture carved in the round from a single block of wood in the form of a frontal portrait bust of a young woman --likely a martyr-- with a decorative hairstyle of looped double braids and wrapped, jeweled head roll. The garment she wears, once gilded, is v-necked in the front and back, with a jeweled trim. The bust, likely a reliquary, would have been used in a devotional context, and set in a niche, on an alter, or carried in processions. Reliquaries were containers to house the relics of saints and other holy persons. During the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, their production was connected with silversmith and goldsmith workshops, of which this example follows t

Image of 66.15 -

66.15 -

This figure of the standing Buddha, with upraised arms and a flame-shaped mandorla topped with a jewel behind the upper half of the figure, shows Tang dynasty style and iconography. It exhibits the long, thin head and limbs and narrow waist. The gilding is significantly worn in many places, revealing the brown bronze core beneath. Reference: Winter, Amy H., with Xiaoping Lin (eds.), "The Light of Infinite Wisdom: Asian Art from the Godwin-Ternbach Museum and Other Collections," Queens College, CUNY, 2003.

Image of 66.16 -

66.16 -

This standing figure of the Buddha is likely a depiction of the Buddha of the Future or Maitreya Buddha. Maitreya Buddha is shown in the world, wearing elaborate jewelry, crowns, robes, and other royal adornments. This piece is cast with a loop on the back to be worn as a protective talisman or secured to an alter arrangement. This Buddha wears the monk's robes as well as a girdle and sash, with a hint of an ornamental garland around his legs, shoulders, and head. A jeweled necklace hangs from his neck, and the ushnisha atop his head is pronounced and jewel-shaped. His pendant right arm seems to hold a garland, and his left arm, broken at the forearm, may have held a lotus flower. Referenc

Image of 66.17 -

66.17 -

This figure of the Buddha seated in the posture of royal ease shows a strong iconographical relationship to Indian art along with Tang dynasty style and iconography. It exhibits the long, thin head and limbs and narrow waist. The gilding is significantly worn in many places, revealing the brown bronze core beneath. The sculpture has a basically static, frontal composition. Reference: Winter, Amy H., with Xiaoping Lin (eds.), "The Light of Infinite Wisdom: Asian Art from the Godwin-Ternbach Museum and Other Collections," Queens College, CUNY, 2003.

Image of 66.30 -

66.30 -

This figure of the Buddha stands on a simple pedestal, its gentle relief carving shows a schematic rendering of the characteristic "swallowtail" or "waterfall" garment folds that are an interpretation of traditional Buddhist robes. The emphasis on these heavy robes over the nearly imperceptible body beneath is distinctive of the Wei-Longmen style. Reference: Winter, Amy H., with Xiaoping Lin (eds.), "The Light of Infinite Wisdom: Asian Art from the Godwin-Ternbach Museum and Other Collections," Queens College, CUNY, 2003.

Image of 66.33 -

66.33 -

This figure of the seated Buddha, with a flame-shaped mandorla topped with a jewel, shows Tang dynasty style and iconography. It exhibits the long, thin head and limbs and narrow waist. The gilding is significantly worn in many places, revealing the brown bronze core beneath. The sculpture has a basically static, frontal composition. Reference: Winter, Amy H., with Xiaoping Lin (eds.), "The Light of Infinite Wisdom: Asian Art from the Godwin-Ternbach Museum and Other Collections," Queens College, CUNY, 2003.

Image of 66.37 -

66.37 -

This standing figure of the Buddha is likely a depiction of the Buddha of the Future or Maitreya Buddha. Maitreya Buddha is shown in the world, wearing elaborate jewelry, crowns, robes, and other royal adornments. This piece is cast with a loop on the back to be worn as a protective talisman or secured to an alter arrangement. This Buddha wears the monk's robes as well as a girdle and sash, with a hint of an ornamental garland around his legs, shoulders, and head. A jeweled necklace hangs from his neck, the ushnisha atop his head is pronounced and jewel-shaped and surrounded by a crown. Reference: Winter, Amy H., with Xiaoping Lin (eds.), "The Light of Infinite Wisdom: Asian Art from the

Image of 66.38 -

66.38 -

This figure of the Buddha is rendered in beautiful detail, revealing the level of perfection achieved by Chinese artisans. The figure stands on a stylized lotus base, and its gentle relief carving reveals beautiful, heavy, "swallowtail" folds in the Buddha's garments. The figure's hands are realistically carved in the "vitarka" or "vyakhyana mudra" - the teaching mudra. He possesses a high, plain Wei style "ushnisha," the protuberance on top of the head that symbolizes his wisdom. Behind him, and forming the sculpture's back, is an ornately incised, full-length "mandorla" filled with flame patterns that symbolize sacred fire and light. Inside this design, an inner halo, or "nimbus," encircles

Image of 67.152 - Chirico, Giorgio de

67.152 - Chirico, Giorgio de

Return of the Prodigal Son I [Il ritorno del figliol prodigo I] from Metamorphosis series, 1929, colored lithograph by Giorgio de Chirico (Italian painter, writer, and scenographer, 1888-1978), numbered 15/100.

Image of 70.90.11 - Pontius, Paulus

70.90.11 - Pontius, Paulus

This etching by Paulus Pontius (1603-1658), a Flemish draftsman and engraver, after Anthony van Dyck (Flemish painter, 1599-1641) portrays Joannes, Count of Nassau-Siegen (Johan the Younger, 1583-1638) in full armor wearing the Order of the Golden Fleece and holding a marshal’s baton. Van Dyck painted Johan the Younger on a number of occasions. The present work dates no earlier than 1627, the year Johan was awarded the Order of the Golden Fleece.

Image of 86.17.3 - Morisot, Berthe

86.17.3 - Morisot, Berthe

Drypoint titled "Jeune femme au repos," 1889, by Berthe Morisot (1841-1895). Jeanne Fourmanoir is possibly the model in this drypoint print, she posed for Morisot on several occasions. The plate was cancelled after the first edition, indicated by piercing two small circles in the edges of the plate, as seen in this impression. The "cancelled" print was republished pothumously in 1910.

Image of 97.4.4 - Kollwitz, Kathe

97.4.4 - Kollwitz, Kathe

Lithograph by Kathe Kollwitz (German, 1867-1945), entitled "Death Attacks" from the series "Abschied und Tod", included in a portfolio of ten lithographs, 1941. “Death Attacks” a lithograph by Kathe Kollwitz, a German artist, who is known for her expressive depictions of the effects of poverty, hunger, and war on the working class. The women in Kollwitz’s work, including her self portraits, are worried and suffering but alert with their eyes wide open; they are mourning but also survivors and protectors. In 1933, the Nazi government forced her to resign her position as the first female professor appointed to the Prussian Academy (in 1919); soon thereafter she was forbidden to exhibit her a