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Name Pre-Columbian

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Image of 2002.7.1 - Unknown

2002.7.1 - Unknown

Double spouted vessel in the shape of a hawk on one side, hawk has a whistle in the back of its head, painted in yellow, black, white, and orange, from the Wari culture of Peru.

Image of 2002.7.23 -

2002.7.23 -

This Coca bag (ch'uspa) is woven with cotton warp and wool weft in red, blue, yellow, green, and white on a brown background in a multi-stripe design, and has separately woven strap in a zig-zag pattern. Marianne Hogue has suggested that the patterns most commonly found in Inca textiles - the step, the zigzag and the rectangle - have political and agricultural significance. A visual representation of reality was a lesser priority than the aesthetic impact of pattern and color and repetition. Pre-Columbian Andeans chose geometry and abstraction as the best means to communicate their ideas, though artists were certainly capable of creating naturalistic representations of the world as can be

Image of 2002.7.3 -

2002.7.3 -

One of the most stunning small pieces in the collection, a pair of ChimĂș ear spools from the central or north coast of Peru dating from 1200-1500 C.E., reveals a unique technique employed in Andean feather art. Here, the ear spool's blue, black, and red feathers are glued onto a wooden backing and trimmed into a flower-like pattern emanating from the center. One should note the slight difference in patterning between the two ear spools, for such variations reveal the difficulty of maintaining the strict precision in patterning that can be found in other art forms such as ceramics or woven textiles. But what these objects and other examples of feather art may lack in uniformity, they make up

Image of 2002.7.44 -

2002.7.44 -

Moche ceramic frog/toad vessel in orange and tan, toad's body is half tan half orange and handle is orange, stirrup spout vessel used for drinking ceremonial chicha or corn beer, the toad was a shamanistic device to accompany the user into a trance or psychic flight. The ceramic Vessel in the form of a frog or toad seen here is part of a long-standing Moche tradition of portrait-like ceramic vessels that included both animals and human heads. While it is easy to be charmed by these works on an aesthetic level, it is important to remember that it is likely that they were functioning simultaneously on a symbolic plane in what Rebecca Stone-Miller has described as an emphasis on verity over

Image of 2002.7.45 -

2002.7.45 -

Inca Fez style hat in natural color cammaloid wools of brown, tan, gray, and black, woven around a vegetable fiber (coiled), The Fez style hat was only found in Chile during the 70-year Inca occupation of Northern Chile Referred to as the "Fez" type because of its similarity to the truncated cone shape of theTurkish Fez. The construction technique is known in basketry as "coiling". A weft of fine camelid threads is looped around a thick coil of the same fiber. (David Bernstein Fine Art- similar examples shown) Marianne Hogue has suggested that the patterns most commonly found in Inca textiles - the step, the zigzag and the rectangle - have political and agricultural significance. A vi

Image of 2002.7.5 -

2002.7.5 -

Pair of Earflares, dark brown wood with the frontals covered in aqua feathers in a circular pattern with an 8-pointed star shape in the middle. One should note the slight difference in patterning between the two ear spools, for such variations reveal the difficulty of maintaining the strict precision in patterning that can be found in other art forms such as ceramics or woven textiles. But what these objects and other examples of feather art may lack in uniformity, they make up for in their remarkable sense of texture and color that cannot be replicated in any other media. Ear spools consist of a round circular disk with a long thick post that is inserted into the ear. They were worn b

Image of 2002.7.9 -

2002.7.9 -

This Huarmey tapestry sleeve has images of two warriors holding staffs, central rectangular panel with two animal images, zigzag pattern in blue along bottom, red, white, blue, yellow, purple, and black colors. According to the Andean scholar Rebecca Stone-Miller, Huari textiles "seem to celebrate geometry itself; their designs read as grid-based, rectilinear, strikingly coloristic, dynamic, and, above all, illegible pattern." As illegible as the fragment may appear, it is nevertheless clear that Huari weavers-typically women, often in collaboration-learned to express themselves, and to express state initiatives, in a language of abstraction. The abstracted iconography favored by Huari wea

Image of 2003.10.2 -

2003.10.2 -

Chavin painted textile section of a tunic, depicts a proto-typical staff bearing figure with fanged mouth and claws visible on the hands and feet, serpents form his staff and hang from his crown, the headband is decorated with a bean motif. A Chavin style fragment with painted images, provides some insight regarding the nature of this cultural exchange. The textile, dating from ca. 400 B.C.E., would likely have been worn by a male of high social standing. The fragment comes from the site of Karwa, located in the south coast of Peru. Some of the earliest remains of cultivated cotton, dating from about 3,500-3,000 B.C.E., were actually discovered in the central coast of Peru and Ecuador, no

Image of 2007.11.2 -

2007.11.2 -

Central coast cultures such as the Chancay are known primarily through burial goods. Vast numbers of textiles have been preserved from the area, though little is known about their specific context because most were recovered by looters, and only a few have been excavated scientifically. Chancay tombs were notable for their textiles and included elaborate gauzes such as the cotton Panel seen here. This type of monochrome openwork with square spaces and embroidery is unique to Chancay and is reminiscent of fishing net. As such, it reflects a textile tradition that developed out of net-making needs, and it signifies the culture's long history fishing the Humboldt Current off the Peruvian coas

Image of 98.4.1 -

98.4.1 -

Woven decorative fringed border with mythological beings. Keeping in mind that some Paracas embroideries measured up to 85 feet long,this piece is a small fragment of the border of a much larger piece. It nevertheless contains a great deal of valuable information for understanding the Paracas textile tradition and the culture as a whole. The border strip shows a row of repeating anthropomorphic figures with outstretched limbs, suggesting that they are in flight. The color scheme is typical of Block Color embroideries (see Notes), with a predominance of rich green, red, yellow, and orange hues. The figures wear stylized masks revealing only a triangular chignon of hair that seems to proje

Image of 2011.81.16 -

2011.81.16 -

Nazca ceramic vessel in the shape of a human head with modelled nose, painted eyes, mouth, moustache, hair, and eyebrows. Decorations in red under eyes and multicolor stripes on upper part of vessel. Trophy head jars like this were used in ceremonially and in burial sites to serve as a substitute for a decapitated head.

Image of 63.50 -

63.50 -

Though the weaver and painter of the Fragment with two figures is unknown, she was clearly highly skilled. This painted fabric displays two figures, one profile animal, probably a llama, and one frontal anthropomorphic male with a crescent headdress and mask-like face. Each figure is rendered in a solid black line and is enclosed within a roughly-square geometric form. The square surrounding the llama is comprised of triangles. The human figure with the headdress and raptorial hands and feet is not unlike images of the so-called Lord of Sipan from the Moche culture (ca. C.E. 1-600), which preceded the Chimu in the same northern coastal valleys. A horizontal line and the hint of vertical

Image of 98.11.2 -

98.11.2 -

From the earliest period of Andean history, textile production contributed to the foundation of a complex society. This textile depicts nine images of feline figures in rectangular panels, in red or brown-yellow colors with contrasting backgrounds. The figures are abstracted and may represent the god Ccoa, who controlled lightning and struck down both crops and people. Citation: Extract taken from essay by Arianne Fernandez, in "SCHOLARS, EXPLORERS, PRIESTS, How the Renaissance Gave Us the Modern World," ex. cat. G -T M, Queens College, CUNY, February 2 - March 27, 2010, 53.

Image of 98.4.22 -

98.4.22 -

Paracas embroidered border decorated with feline "Oculate" being. Unlike the textiles of many other cultures, Paracas textiles are embroidered rather than painted. Embroidery is a superstructural technique, meaning that stitches are made on top of a plain ground cloth to form the textile's principal decoration. Paracas artisans excelled at a number of different embroidery techniques, including the Linear Style and Broad Line Style, whose names reveal their essential characteristics. But perhaps their most virtuoso achievement can be found in the Block Color style of embroidery. Block Color embroidery consists of outlining the central figure or design element and then filling in the inter

Image of 98.4.2 -

98.4.2 -

Fragment decorated with crouched animals. According to the Andean scholar Rebecca Stone-Miller, Wari textiles "seem to celebrate geometry itself; their designs read as grid-based, rectilinear, strikingly coloristic, dynamic, and, above all, illegible pattern." As illegible as the fragment may appear, it is nevertheless clear that Wari weavers-typically women, often in collaboration-learned to express themselves, and to express state initiatives, in a language of abstraction. The abstracted iconography favored by Wari weavers included staff-bearing figures, tunic wearers, frontal faces, profile faces, skulls, animals, stepped diamonds, and stepped triangles and frets. Jeremy George, "Vari

Image of 98.4.4 -

98.4.4 -

At first glance Huari (Wari) textile compositions, such as the Tunic fragment with profile faces and frets, appear to be unintelligible. According to the Andean scholar Rebecca Stone-Miller, Wari textiles "seem to celebrate geometry itself; their designs read as grid-based, rectilinear, strikingly coloristic, dynamic, and, above all, illegible pattern." As illegible as the fragment may appear, it is nevertheless clear that Wari weavers-typically women, often in collaboration-learned to express themselves, and to express state initiatives, in a language of abstraction. The abstracted iconography favored by Wari weavers included staff-bearing figures, tunic wearers, frontal faces, profile faces

Image of 98.4.5 -

98.4.5 -

Bag panel or fragment decorated with rows of deer. The well-known monumental desert petroglyphs, the Nasca lines often represent animals in large and abstracted forms, with little curvilinearity or naturalness of structure. This may be a result of technical determinism, that is, the limitations of creating large artworks from stones and sand. But textiles such as the bag panel indicate this was an aesthetic preference. While earlier Nasca textiles were painted in bright colors and curvilinear designs, this later-period textile fragment introduces iconography and design that can be compared to the large earthworks and to early textiles from the region as well as Paracas textiles. Renee McG

Image of 99.2.12 -

99.2.12 -

Nose Ornament, embossed face set in center, face has both animal and human characteristics, could be a mask, elaborate headdress surrounding face, beak-like nose, open mouth. This gold-washed bronze Nose ornament with an embossed face is representative of sumptuary burial goods that have been excavated in the region. Small in size (measuring only 1?" in diameter), it is likely that the ornament would have dangled from a septum piercing in life. Similar objects have been found buried with their presumed owners in death. Renee McGarry, " Metalwork Objects," in "Natural and Supernatural: Andean Textiles and Material Culture," (G -T M, Queens College, CUNY, February 14-June 1, 2006), 21.

Image of 99.2.14 -

99.2.14 -

This decorative piece, made out of a very thin sheet of gold, portrays a warrior holding a spear and shield. It is constructed in relief and pierced through the gold at the warrior's hands. The warrior wears a helmet or headdress and is decorated with chasing and repousee detail on the face and body. Such pins were tunjos, votive objects, made in a variety of forms that frequently depicted warrior figures with trophy heads or weapons, miniature pots, and animals. Tunjos were usually used as offerings and left in caves or holes. They were made for the larger Muisca population for ritual offerings. * Arianne Fernandez, in "SCHOLARS, EXPLORERS, PRIESTS, How the Renaissance Gave Us the Modern

Image of 99.2.29 -

99.2.29 -

Feline weaving sample, weaving is attached to two wooden sticks on either end, half is woven and half is unwoven black thread, area around feline's legs and head is slit weaving; remainder is interlocked weaving, gold and black striped pattern below feline's body, feline is composed of grey, white, black, and gold thread, showing teeth, background is red. This textile sampler on a miniature tapestry loom produced between 300 and 600 C.E. by a Chancay weaver, offers opportunities for interpretation and insight into the process of creation. As the textile and loom are in miniature, it is likely that they were included in a burial. Art historians have supposed that such looms and samplers inc