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Name Textile

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Image of 98.4.14 -

98.4.14 -

Side panel of bedding bag from the Shahsavan tribe, Azerbaijan, with decorative bands, rhomboids, and bull designs. The nomadic Shahsavan tribe are Azeri-Turkish speaking pastoralists who migrate between the steppe of Azerbaijan in the winter and Mount Sabalan in the northwest of Iran in the summer.

Image of 98.4.22 -

98.4.22 -

Paracas embroidered border decorated with feline "Oculate" being. Unlike the textiles of many other cultures, Paracas textiles are embroidered rather than painted. Embroidery is a superstructural technique, meaning that stitches are made on top of a plain ground cloth to form the textile's principal decoration. Paracas artisans excelled at a number of different embroidery techniques, including the Linear Style and Broad Line Style, whose names reveal their essential characteristics. But perhaps their most virtuoso achievement can be found in the Block Color style of embroidery. Block Color embroidery consists of outlining the central figure or design element and then filling in the inter

Image of 98.4.2 -

98.4.2 -

Fragment decorated with crouched animals. According to the Andean scholar Rebecca Stone-Miller, Wari textiles "seem to celebrate geometry itself; their designs read as grid-based, rectilinear, strikingly coloristic, dynamic, and, above all, illegible pattern." As illegible as the fragment may appear, it is nevertheless clear that Wari weavers-typically women, often in collaboration-learned to express themselves, and to express state initiatives, in a language of abstraction. The abstracted iconography favored by Wari weavers included staff-bearing figures, tunic wearers, frontal faces, profile faces, skulls, animals, stepped diamonds, and stepped triangles and frets. Jeremy George, "Vari

Image of 98.4.4 -

98.4.4 -

At first glance Huari (Wari) textile compositions, such as the Tunic fragment with profile faces and frets, appear to be unintelligible. According to the Andean scholar Rebecca Stone-Miller, Wari textiles "seem to celebrate geometry itself; their designs read as grid-based, rectilinear, strikingly coloristic, dynamic, and, above all, illegible pattern." As illegible as the fragment may appear, it is nevertheless clear that Wari weavers-typically women, often in collaboration-learned to express themselves, and to express state initiatives, in a language of abstraction. The abstracted iconography favored by Wari weavers included staff-bearing figures, tunic wearers, frontal faces, profile faces

Image of 98.5 -

98.5 -

This Huari mummy bundle mask served as the face covering for a mummified corpse. The iridescent orange, black, white, and blue feathers are systematically sewn onto a cotton backing to resemble human facial features. The feathered mask is topped with real human hair and wears a woven hat. The mask commands a strong presence. The complementary orange and blue feathers, as well as the contrasting black and white feathers delineating the teeth and eyes, endow it with a colorful dynamism. This piece integrates a wealth of distinct materials, including feathers, human hair, and cloth, into a unified work of art. Paradoxically, while the mask provides a significant aesthetic experience for its vi

Image of 99.2.29 -

99.2.29 -

Feline weaving sample, weaving is attached to two wooden sticks on either end, half is woven and half is unwoven black thread, area around feline's legs and head is slit weaving; remainder is interlocked weaving, gold and black striped pattern below feline's body, feline is composed of grey, white, black, and gold thread, showing teeth, background is red. This textile sampler on a miniature tapestry loom produced between 300 and 600 C.E. by a Chancay weaver, offers opportunities for interpretation and insight into the process of creation. As the textile and loom are in miniature, it is likely that they were included in a burial. Art historians have supposed that such looms and samplers inc

Image of 99.2.6 -

99.2.6 -

A large Bag with long tassels is made from cotton and wool fibers. The bag is woven with cotton warp and wool weft in a minute and painstaking pattern. White, black, and deep red fibers create an interlocking system of triangles and diamonds, which repeat in three vertical columns. The arrangement of the colors and shapes allow the pattern a nearly three-dimensional appearance, which may have been a strategic device intended to evoke some aspect of the natural world. Such a reading follows Marianne Hogue's suggestion that the checkerboard pattern found in some Inca textiles symbolized the mountains that they terraced for agricultural purposes. Although Inca textiles were sometimes c

Image of T2006.7.1 - Unknown

T2006.7.1 - Unknown

Hand-woven fragment of a tunic made of camelid fiaber, natural dyes. Peru, Huari (Wari), 500-100 AD.