Object Record

  • Email This Page
  • Send Feedback
Catalog number P165
Artist Hollar, Wenceslaus
Title A Bolognese Dog
Date 1649
Object Name Print
Description This is part of another series of animal studies by Wenceslaus Hollar (Bohemian draftsman, etcher, and illustrator, 1607-1677, active in Germany, Flanders, and England), an artist known for his careful naturalistic observation. The dog is set in a shallow nondescript space, with only the faintest suggestion of the line of the table where the dog is positioned. The detailed attention to the dog's fur and anatomy is another example of Hollar's merging of science and art--when natural history initially involved empirical study of nature's creatures.

Medieval depictions of animals in mosaics, tapestries, and paintings are quite different from Hollar's "Bolognese Dog". Medieval people were humbled and constrained by nature, having only limited technology to control and study it. Thus they had little accurate knowledge and often portrayed animals fantastically and/or schematically. Dogs, however, were domesticated, and more families owned dogs than before. They were used for warmth in the winters, to perform utilitarian tasks in the home, and as companions.
Kimberley Babcock, in "SCHOLARS, EXPLORERS, PRIESTS, How the Renaissance Gave Us the Modern World," ex. cat. G -T M, Queens College, CUNY, February 2 - March 27, 2010, 26.
Medium/Material Ink on paper
Dimensions H-3 W-5 inches
Search Terms Baroque
17th century AD
Animal
Dog
Canine
Great Britain
Europe
Czechia
Exhibition and Publication History * Ex. cat. "SCHOLARS, EXPLORERS, PRIESTS, How the Renaissance Gave Us the Modern World," Curated by James M. Saslow, G -T M, Queens College, CUNY, February 2 - March 27, 2010, # 26, ill.
Culture Bohemian/English